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Civil Engineering Photos: Part 2

Civil Engineering Photos: Part 2

This week I’ve been busy moving house; driving a van and packing boxes. I’m also learning just how dependent on the internet I truly am. Not wanting to leave my adoring (and simply tolerating) public without a weekly dose of Being Brunel, I thought I’d get together a second part to the Photographic Engineering post from earlier this year, with some more fantastic Civil Engineering photos.

Civil Engineer’s Dream

The Civil Engineers Dream

The sun always shines on a viaduct.

Who doesn’t like a bit of Roman Aqueduct action? Silhouetted against the Spanish sun it’s easy to see why Andrew Griffith stopped to take an amazing photo of this beauty in Segovia.

Ready to Roll

Ready to Roll

It’s gonna take more than a rodding eye to clean this network.

Looking like the setup to the longest pipe-run in history; this photo by “GordonTour” shows the scope of Civil Engineering works. With each segment of the Libyan “man-made river” waiting alongside the construction road- as far as the eye can see, and then some.

Cornish-Windsor Covered Bridge

Cornish-Windsor Covered Bridge

I’d hate to get wet on a bridge…

When you’re not sure if you’d rather a bridge or a tunnel- why not go for a covered bridge? And what a great example “C Hanchey” has snapped. This bridge is actually the longest two-span covered bridge in the world, shot brilliantly against a moody background.

Civil HDR Engineering

Civil HDR Engineering

A brand new Civil Engineering day

I didn’t even know what HDR meant until I saw this photo by Junior Henry, but I have to say it definitely gives a sense of heroism to building construction!

Orange and Alexandria Railroad

Orange and Alexandria Railroad

I wonder if this is still with us today?

This historic photo from the U.S. Army national archives harks back to a time of more practical engineering (lit. “If it doesn’t fall down it must be fine”). The haphazard truss looks like something out of a picture book; although I wouldn’t want to admire it from too close…

A lot of the photos and fonts I use for Being Brunel are Creative Commons artistry. If you want to find out more about the people who have crafted and shared these fantastic resources check out the Attributions page.

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